Chord Buddy

Learn to play guitar instantly

How To Read Tab

Tabs are not always posted on the Internet by a professional musician Sometimes are written by amateurs or talented young kids who fail to apply the concept of putting yourself in other’s shoes. A very talented young musician may not take the trouble (courtesy) to take into account the difficulties a beginner has to face and could write complicated Tabs that seem pretty simple at first sight but are really a big obstacle for someone just starting out.
So you’ll see that there are many different versions of tablatures for the same song. And when you print a tablature of your favorite song that you found on the Internet, whoever wrote it, may have made it very complicated to read because it is a professional musician or made mistakes because it was written by an amateur.
How to Read Tabs
Tabs or Tablature is the easiest way to read music for guitar. You can learn the system in 2 minutes.
It’s basically a combination of 2 numbers:
• The string
• The fret ( metal bars you see across the neck)
Sometimes it also includes the names of the chords. Examples: C, Gm, Bb, D7.
1 —————-
2 —————-
3 —————-
4 —————-
5 —————-
6—————-
The numbers that you see on the left correspond to the strings, number 1
being the thinnest string on the guitar. Many tabs do not even show these
numbers written on the left because it is a standard in the world of music, so
it is not necessary to write down string numbers, everyone is supposed to
know that the top line corresponds to the first string.
The OTHER numbers that will show up between the lines throughout the song,
are the fret numbers of the notes you should play. If multiple notes appear in
a vertical line, those notes should be played at the SAME TIME. For example,
the D major chord consists of 3 notes:
1 ——- 2 ———-
2 ——- 3 ———-
3 ——- 2 ———-
4 —————-
5 —————-
6 ——- x ———-
The sixth string has an X because that note should not be played. it does not belong to the D chord. I usually try to help my students by explaining symbols they might find in tabs they download from the Internet because these symbols might seem strange: ¨p¨ between 2 numbers. This means pull off.
• WHILE placing your fingers on the frets specified.
• Play the first note and release the finger corresponding to the highest
number WITHOUT playing again with your right hand. In other words, the sound of the second note occurs when you release the first note without the help of the right hand.
• Example: – 3-p-2 —
¨/¨ between two numbers refers to a SLIDE.
• Place one finger on the first note
• And using the SAME finger, slide up to the next specified note while
holding pressure, you must never stop holding pressure or you will lose
the sound.
• Example: -2 / 5 –
So, you play the first note only once. The sound of the second note is produced by sliding the SAME finger. ¨h¨ between 2 numbers, the opposite of pull off, it means HAMMER.
• You play the first note ONLY ONCE. The sound of the second note is obtained by tapping (hammering) strongly the second note with ANOTHER finger.
• Example:-2-h-4-
You use one finger for the first note, hit hard the second note with another finger. We’re talking about the fingers of your left hand. ¨b¨ means BEND.
• You play the specified note and, without changing fret …
• BEND the string up or down, to cause the effect.
• Example: —– 14 – b
There are 2 major problems with tablatures:
• Tabs do not specify the duration of the notes.
• Tabs were invented BEFORE computers.
The first problem is not a problem because you probably knew the song’s rhythm before you printed the tablature, but the second problem itself is problematic. (How many times I said the word ‘problem’?) There are specific symbols to determine how notes should be played, but
these symbols can not be found in computers’ keyboards. They are small curves, curved arrows, strange long lines you can see in tablatures printed in guitar or bass magazines.
When people began using the Internet to share thousands of tablatures, they had to use characters that were present on the computer keyboard to replace the actual Tab symbols that could not be typed.
So instead of using the symbol for BEND (upward curve) they used the letter ‘b’ next to the number of the note. And instead of using the symbol for SLIDE (straight long line) they used just the letter ‘s’ or the diagonal line (/) from the keyboard. After many years of practicing this method, the characters most used on keyboards became ‘Standard’ for all guitar lovers and Internet users. Today, when you print a tab, you might see the actual Tab symbols or these computer keyboard alternatives.
But do not think that the symbols of the tabs are in danger of extinction.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Guitar Setup: Make Your Acoustic Guitar Easier To Play

SORE FINGERS?
Sore fingers from playing guitar is an important subject because for many beginners when they start practicing regularly, like you should, their fingers get sore. This is particularly an issue on the steel-string acoustic guitar, not so much of an issue on the nylon string or electric guitar, because of the different kinds of strings they use. Just to be clear I am talking about the fingers of the left hand. The left hand is the hand with the fingers you press down into the strings, and the middle strings will cut into your fingers, and they will make your fingers sore.
WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP IT?
Now, there are several things you can do about this which I will go over, and you can explore which option works best for you.
CHANGE THE STRINGS
Changing the strings is one way to help the pain is to put lighter strings on your guitar. I would recommend starting off by putting extra-light acoustic guitar strings on your acoustic guitar. They are thinner, but they still sound good. Another option is to put electric guitar strings on your guitar. They don’t sound as good, but you can put thinner strings on that way, and of course, you can always build up to thicker strings.
Another possibility is a type of string called “silk and steel”. This string is a hybrid-type of string that is in-between a steel string and a nylon string, and it goes on the acoustic guitar. It has a softer sound and a softer feel. Some people don’t like the sound, and it might not be the overall sound-solution for you, but it is a good stepping stone to get to the thicker strings on the acoustic guitar.
ADJUST THE ACTION
Another guitar setup possibility is to adjust the action of your guitar. What I mean by adjusting the action is that you are going to adjust the height of the strings so they are closer to the frets on the neck of the guitar. This will make it easier for you to push the strings down. Now there are several steps in adjusting the action of a guitar, and it involves making the nut of the guitar lower, the bridge of the guitar lower, and the neck just the right angle.
COMPLETE GUITAR SETUP – FILE DOWN THE FRETS
Another guitar setup option is to file down the frets so they are more even. The trick is to get the strings as low as possible without buzzing anywhere up and down the neck. You want to be able to press the note and have it sound nice and clear, and to not hit one of the frets higher up. This is tricky, and I recommend getting a competent guitar repairman to do a complete guitar setup.
If you are mechanically inclined and have a reasonable tolerance for risk, you can learn how to do it. Check out videos on YouTube that I have seen. The risk involved is that if you file the nut too low or the bridge, you are going to have to go out and get a new one. You can actually over-tighten that metal truss rod in the neck of the guitar to the point you even break the neck on your guitar. This is a really tricky option that I would not recommend.
TOUGH IT OUT
The last resort is to play your guitar with sore fingers until they get tough. Now they will actually get tough. It usually takes about three or four weeks, and some people can just work through it. The trick is to find that place where if it is holding you back from practicing, do what you need to do to get easier strings on the guitar. If you can keep practicing and wait until they get tough, then go for it. There is nothing wrong with that, and once you get calluses on your fingers, or thicker skin rather, you really won’t have to worry about that much anymore in the future as long as you keep playing. If you stop playing for a while you might have to go through that process of building calluses again.
In summary:
• Change The Strings
•Lighter Strings – Extra Light
•Electric Guitar Strings
•Silk & Steel

• Adjust The Action
•Lower Bridge Saddle
•Lower Nut
•Even Out Frets
•Adjust Truss Rod

• Options for Adjusting The Guitar
•Competent Repair Person (best)
•Learn Yourself
•YouTube Videos

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The 3 Biggest Problems With Your Strumming, And How To Fix Them!

Dear Guitarists,

I don’t think there’s a single guitarist that doesn’t strum sometimes. It’s very common for guitarists to learn the CAGED chords, and some simple strumming patterns, as the first thing they ever do with the instrument! Strumming just means holding a chord and moving a pick or fingers across the strings, right? It’s a very simple idea. But you might be doing something wrong! Everyone can improve; it doesn’t mean you’re bad if a tip helps you! I look for hints and tips constantly myself, and I have a trio up my sleeve for any strummers reading this. I’ve decided to cover more than one aspect of strumming, in the hope that at least one will help you. Even if you’re already very experienced! The

First Problem – Tension.

In the hopes of being useful to even the more experienced players, here’s one that creeps up over time and isn’t about having learned wrong, or  having bad technique. It’s tension. It’s very easy to start gripping the pick a bit harder; it’s easy to stiffen up over time and start breathing too hard. All of this affects your overall level of tension and will stop you from playing expressively, and effortlessly.

How do you fight tension, though? Do you just force yourself to relax? I normally find making an effort to relax makes me tense up! So, I have some extremely simple tricks you can try. Practice holding a pick, or strumming with nails as lightly as possible – only increase grip if the pick is going to fall out of your hand, and only strum harder with nails if the sound’s too quiet. The idea here is to reset what your normal grip, or strum, strength is. If it’s gotten too tense over time, this will bring it back to a more comfortable level that still works. The other trick is to part you lips and let your jaw go loose when you play. Sounds crazy, right? Just trust me and give it a shot. When you strain to open a jar, you grind your teeth – it’s like a lever for tension. Just like it can be caused by tension, it can cause tension. Make sure your jaw’s loose if it isn’t already when you play.

The Second Problem – Rushing.

Rushing is a big deal, it’s the difference between a tight performance and a mess. When you strum, what you’re really doing is playing up to 6 (more on an extended range guitar that has extra strings) notes very, very quickly. It sounds like they’re played at the same time, but really you have to hit strings one at a time no matter how fast you strum. This can create an issue, or two, if you aren’t thoughtful abut your playing. So you’ve got a beat; a pulse. You’re strumming and you come to the end of a bar, the next bar is a different chord. The temptation is to strum early so that the strum is part-way through on the beat, rather than starting on the beat. Sometimes it is what you want, of course, but a great deal of music needs the separation between bars to be very crisp and clear. Going early can help fluff up a chord change and give you more time, but that’s useless if it hurts the music! My suggestion here is a strange one, but it has proven results. Find a metronome, a physical one or one of many free online metronomes, and set it to a comfortable pace to strum a simple pattern. Now, instead of trying to hit the beat on time, wait until slightly after the beat and then begin your strum.

Work on playing after the beat. Then speed it up to a more brisk tempo, around a speed that’s fast for you. Slowly bring the start of the strum back so that it happens on the beat or only just after. What this does is preventing you from blurring bars and beats together by rushing to  strum before a beat. It trains you to be slightly late if you aren’t spot on, rather than slightly earlier. The Third Problem – Your chord changes aren’t clean. OK, so maybe they’re pretty clean… But they could be cleaner! Players normally get better at changing between chords over time, as they play songs including those transitions.

The problem is, though, that this is fairly inefficient practice for changing chords. If you’re playing a song where the same chord is played for two bars at a time, you only practice a change every eight beats! What I propose for everyone to try is, no matter what chords the song involves, take each change within the song and practice it on its own. Set a metronome going or tap your foot, and just switch between two chord – one beat each. For example: G, D, G, D, G, D… One after the other. That’s four times the efficiency in practicing hing is a big deal, it’s the difference between a tight performance and a mess. changes than if you played a bar of each! Depending on where you are with your playing, some of these tips will be more helpful than others. I think there’s definitely a little bit for everyone here, so make sure to check all three problems and see what the solutions can do for you!

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

7 Mistakes Most Guitarists Make – And How To Avoid Them!

Like everyone else, we aren’t immune to making mistakes -regardless of our constant effort and hard work. Often these mistakes are due to lack of guidance, or too much of it, or just the plain confusion of trying something totally new. Below is a list of the biggest mistakes most beginner guitarists make and how to stay away from them.

Big Mistake # 1: Practicing Incorrectly.

Practicing for long hours on the guitar can be mentally stressful, but you shouldn’t be physically burned out. If you feel tired even after half an hour of practice, chances are that you are doing it incorrectly. Improper posture and positioning of the guitar can paramount to unnecessary physical stress that can make practice time a struggle.

Here’s a couple tips to help you out:

Try not to hunch your back, keep your guitar angled towards you slightly, and ensure the dip of the guitar is resting on your lap on the same side as your strumming hand.

Big Mistake # 2: Expecting Miracles and Lightning Results.

Like learning anything new, playing the guitar takes time, patience and a lot of practice! If you are mislead by others thinking that playing the guitar can happen overnight, then you are on a long, frustrating journey. Be prepared to face challenges, practice, and encounter mistakes along the way. With your hard work and patience, rewards will surely await you.

Big Mistake # 3: Choosing the Wrong Songs To Practice

Trying to play songs that are clearly out of your interest zone is like trying to stomach down a moldy sandwich – it just doesn’t work. Since you will be spending long hours trying to perfect something on the guitar, better choose the songs that are closest to your heart. Not only will you be excited to perfect the piece, you will also find that time will just slip by without you noticing. Beginner guitar songs don’t need to be boring. There are a ton of songs perfect for first time guitar players.

Big Mistake # 4: Pushing Beyond Your Limits

Pushing yourself beyond what is right isn’t only emotionally and physically straining, but it’ll also dampen your motivation and lead you to the dead end road of frustration. Still having difficulties perfecting the F barre chord after long hours of practice? Stand up and go for a walk. Distract yourself to something that doesn’t involve the guitar, music or chords. Read a good book, play a relaxing game or take Buddy out for a breath of fresh air. Once you are calmed, relaxed and de-stressed, pick up your guitar again. Never try to practice when you are on the brink of frustration. Remember, these things take time. Be patient.

Big Mistake # 5: Not Having a Roadmap to Success

Always make a clear set of goals that you want to achieve on the guitar. Try to plan out the songs that you want to play, the chords associated with it, and the other things that you plan to learn. Having a guide or a “roadmap to success” will clearly illustrate the things that you have achieved so far and things that you have yet to accomplish.

Big Mistake # 6: Learning Just Theory

Trying to memorize hundreds of chords and scales, and how to execute them is totally useless if you can’t appreciate how they apply to your guitar playing. Choose your favorite beginner song (take note of mistake #3), search for the chords and practice playing it. Once you have mastered the song, choose another song and do the same steps. This way, you put into heart the chords that you have learned and you get to apply it by playing your favorite song! Over time, you will learn various chords, scales and different finger plucking in a pace that’s less frustrating and thoroughly enjoyable. For a better way to learn guitar, be sure to check out my 81 page Ebook “Beginners Guide To Learning Guitar”. It will have you learning to play the guitar in just 48 hours or less, even if you’ve never strummed a chord before.

Big Mistake # 7: Giving Up

Lastly, if you feel beaten down, frustrated and extremely tired, NEVER, NEVER Ever GIVE UP. Van Halen, Steve Vai, John Lennon and other prominent guitarists all faced the same difficulties that you’re facing right now at some point while they were still learning to strum, fret and learn to play the guitar. Always see the positive side of things. If you are facing a handful of difficulties, it just means that you are learning – and that’s good.

Conclusion

Learning something is always difficult at first, so do your best not to get frustrated if your fingers start hurting, the guitar goes out of tune, your neighbors begin complaining, or if you don’t sound great right away. All great guitarists had to begin where you are right now.

The difference between those that try and give up, and those who become great guitar players, is that great guitar players keep trying no matter what. Just remember that playing the guitar should be fun. Don’t give up, keep practicing and enjoy yourself.

Before you know it you will be the next guitar hero!

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

All about Guitar strings

This lesson is designed to give you all of the basic information that you need to know about different types of acoustic and electric guitar strings. We will talk about string gauges, types of acoustic strings, types of electric strings, coated vs. non coated strings, nylon strings, flatwound vs. roundwound, what strings are made of, differences in tone and much more.  Hopefully you will use this lesson to educate yourself about the different kinds of strings out there and maybe even use some of the different types of strings that you learn about to experiment with your own personal guitar tone.

String Gauges

Overview ‐ The Gauge of a string is simply the thickness of that string. This is usually measured in thousandths of an inch. Typically a set of strings will be named after the thickness of the 1st or thinnest string in the set. You may hear some say that they use “10’s”. That just means that they are using a set of strings where the 1st string is .010 of an inch thick.

Acoustic String Gauges ‐ Acoustic guitar strings usually come in sets anywhere from .010 ‐ .013. The most common gauge is considered to be light or .012 gauge. Anything lighter than .012 is considered to be a custom‐light or an extra‐light. Typically, the heaviest acoustic strings that you will see will be medium or .013 gauge.

Acoustic String Gauge Pros & Cons ‐ Thicker gauge strings sound fuller and louder but they are harder to play. This is great if you like a really thick tone or need a lot of volume out of your acoustic guitar. Using a thinner gauge of strings will make your guitar easier to play but you will sacrifice some tone and volume.

Electric String Gauges ‐ Electric guitar string gauges usually range from .008 ‐ .013. You can find sets thicker than .013 but they are usually flatwound sets or for baritone guitars. Typically you will find .009 or .010 gauge strings on most electric guitars. Jazz guitars will typically have thicker flatwound sets on them.

Electric String Gauge Pros & Cons ‐ Thicker gauge strings sound fuller but they are a bit harder to play, just like on the acoustic. If you are more concerned with having a fat tone than you are with playability you might want to use thicker strings on your electric. Thicker gauge electric strings are also great if you down tune your guitar. Using a thinner gauge of strings will make it easier to play your guitar but you will sacrifice some tone and the strings will be a bit looser feeling.

 

Acoustic Strings: Bronze vs. Phosphor Bronze

Bronze

Bronze acoustic guitar strings are typically pretty bright when compared to phosphor bronze strings. They are also more golden in color while phosphor bronze strings have a bit of a red or copper tint to them. Bronze is made of 90% copper and 10% tin. Typically, bronze guitar strings will be 80% copper and 20% tin. Bronze is softer than steel but it still resists corrosion pretty well, especially around salt‐water or humid climates.

Common Brands D’Addario,

Martin, Ernie Ball, Elixir, Cleartone, John Pearse, GHS, Dean Markley, DR, Fender, Black Diamond.

History and Usage

Discovered around the 4th millennium B.C. Used for tools tiles, boat fittings and Cymbals.

Alloys Typically

90% Copper and 10% Tin.

Sound ‐ A bit brighter than Phosphor Bronze strings.

Cost Non‐

Coated $5 ‐ $10. Coated $10 ‐ $20.

Phosphor Bronze

Phosphor Bronze acoustic guitar strings are a bit warmer and airy than regular bronze strings. A lot of players think that this makes them better for finger picking. They also have a bit more of a red or copper color to them as well. Phosphor bronze is like regular bronze but it has a small amount of phosphor added to it. This helps to keep the metal from oxidizing or corroding as quickly.

Common Brands ‐ D’ddario, Martin, Ernie Ball, Elixir, Cleartone, John

Pearse, GHS, Dean Markley, DR, Fender, Black Diamond.

Other Uses ‐ Ship propellors, springs, bolts.

Alloys ‐ Typically 90% Copper, 10% Tin and a small amount of Phosphor.

Sound ‐ A bit warmer and robust than regular Bronze strings.

Cost ‐ Non‐Coated $5 ‐ $10. Coated $10 ‐ $20.

Electric Strings: Nickel Plated, Pure Nickel & Stainless Steel

Nickel Plated

Nickel‐plated strings are probably the most common type of electric guitar string in use today. The winding on the thicker strings is made of nickel‐plated steel. The steel that the string is made of is great for the magnets in the pickups to “pick up” while the nickel‐plating helps to balance out the bright sound of the steel. The nickel also helps to keep the string smooth and protects it from corrosion. Nickel is a bit softer than steel so nickel or nickel‐plated strings won’ wear your frets out as quickly as stainless steel strings will.

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Garth Brooks – The Thunder Rolls – How To Play On Guitar

Learn how to play Garth Brooks – The Thunder Rolls with this easy guitar tutorial. For easy playing the intro, guitar chords, lyrics and strum patterns. I invite you to  subscribe to my YouTube channel below for more great free video guitar tutorials. Please like and share this video with your family and friends. Thanks for watching.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

El Paso by Marty Robbins – How To Play – Easy Guitar Tutorial

Learn how to play El Paso by Marty Robbins with this easy guitar tutorial. For easy playing, the intro, guitar chords, lyrics, and strum pattern are shown. I invite you to subscribe to my YouTube channel below for more great free video guitar tutorials. Please like and share this video with your family and friends. Thanks for watching.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How To Play It’s All Over Now – Rolling Stones

It’s All Over Now – Rolling Stones – How To Play – Easy Guitar Tutorial

In this easy guitar tutorial, you will learn how to play It’s All Over Now by the Rolling Stones. The intro, chords, lyrics, and strumming pattern included for easy playing. I would invite you sharing with a friend also and Like and leave your comments below. Hope you enjoy.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Learn Basic Guitar Chords

I’ve talked to a lot of my on line students and discovered that many are not only struggling with the basics of guitar… but also need help playing their favourite and most popular songs BETTER. I’ve always said, the best way to get better on guitar is TO PLAY! (don’t squeeze a stupid tennis ball)

So I started surfing the web for quality guitar instruction to solve this common problem and came across a really good site that’s designed for beginning and intermediate players. They claim to be selling the World’s Best and Fastest Guitar Learning System and after reading their website I actually believe it to be true. This device is incredible and would be a great start to any beginner still trying to get the hang of chords and strumming at the same time. Learning chords, co-ordinating the strumming with the finger chords, remembering finger positions are all part of that challenge. Chord Buddy Australia made it possible to eliminate those challenges.

 

CLICK HERE TO CHECK THEM OUT !!! http://www.buychordbuddy.com/

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How to Get a Girl by Teaching Her How to Play the Guitar

infographly_How to Get a Girl by Teaching Her How to Play the Guitar

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Sucuri WebSite Firewall - CloudProxy - Access Denied

Sucuri WebSite Firewall - CloudProxy - Access Denied

What is going on?

You are not allowed to access the requested page. If you are the site owner, you can whitelist your IP using this procedure: https://kb.sucuri.net/cloudproxy/Whitelist+and+Blacklist/whitelisting-IP. If you are not the owner of the web site, you can contact us at cloudproxy@sucuri.net. Also make sure to include the block details (displayed below), so we can better troubleshoot the error.

Block details

  • Your IP: 162.208.49.125
  • URL: webuildtools.com/render.php
  • Your Browser: WordPress/4.3.6; http://www.newchordbuddy.com
  • Block ID: CUST01
  • Block reason: Access to this page was restricted by the administrator.
  • Time: Fri Dec 2 16:50:39 2016
  • Server ID: cp14010

Sucuri CloudProxy

CloudProxy is the WebSite Firewall from Sucuri. It stands between your site and the rest of the world and protects against attacks, malware infections, DDOS, brute force attempts and mostly anything that can harm it.

Not only that, but your sites get cached, speeding it up quite a bit. Interested? Visit https://sucuri.net/website-firewall